January 23, 2007


i love taking older, vintage, antique objects and finding new, innovative purposes for them in my home. here are just a few of my favorite re-purposed vintage finds.
*below is an antique camera our downstairs neighbor, sue, had years ago. she passed away last year leaving some of her belongings to us. this camera no longer works, but the box is used as a small storage container in the kitchen. the camera itself hangs in the small space between will's record shelves & window.

*below is a neat hand-me-down from the coles. it's a retro beige sturdy container with a small brown leaf & dot pattern. this vintage, functional planter was a kitchen canister in the Cole household years ago and was just sitting in their garage since who-knows-when. mrs. c gave to us and it works very well for one of our houseplants. any china, porcelain, stone or glass container works as a planter. as long as it's water-proof, you can make it work. simply put some rocks or stones at the base of the planter for drainage. then add some soil, and the plant. voila! vintage/antique planter out of free old stuff.

*below: this mirror was nana's that she had tucked away in the closet in her attic. i found it when getting something for her in college and she said to take it. there are 2 of them. both with these lovely etchings in them. one large, one small. the larger one i have on the tiger oak kitchen table as a centerpiece. it's easy to clean, practical, and a really pretty addition to the kitchen.

*above: good ideas
1-have an antique, cut-glass spooner on your table. that's where you keep the medium-sized, every-day-used spoons.
2-to have an antique wooden stirrup on your table. that's where you keep your napkins.
this spans aunts, uncles, even my divorced parents spread the stirrup-spooner gospel to their new spouses. i don't know if we're the only ones that use such objects as storage & display for spoons & napkins, but i kinda dig it. i have brought the tradition with me to brooklyn.
behind the spooner & stirrup: framed vintage advertisements.

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